Morphing material has mighty potential

David Ruth
713-348-6327
david@rice.edu

Mike Williams
713-348-6728
mikewilliams@rice.edu

Morphing material has mighty potential

Composite invented at Rice may find use in bioscaffolds, optics, drugs 

HOUSTON – (Dec. 9, 2013) – Heating a sheet of plastic may not bring it to life – but it sure looks like it does in new experiments at Rice University.

The materials created by Rice polymer scientist Rafael Verduzco and his colleagues start as flat slabs, but they morph into shapes that can be controlled by patterns written into their layers.

The research is the subject of a new paper in the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Soft Matter.

Materials that can change their shape based on environmental conditions are useful for optics, three-dimensional biological scaffolds and the controlled encapsulation and release of drugs, among other applications, the researchers wrote.

“We already know the materials are biocompatible, stable and inert,” Verduzco said, “so they have great potential for biological applications.”

The material needs two layers to perform its magic, Verduzco said. One is a liquid crystal elastomer (LCE), a rubber-like material of cross-linked polymers that line up along a single axis, called the “nematic director.” The other is a thin layer of simple polystyrene, placed either above or below the LCE.

Without the polystyrene layer bonded to it, an LCE would simply expand or contract along its nematic axis when heated. With changing temperature, the LCE tries to contract or expand, but the stiffer polystyrene layer prevents this and instead causes wrinkling, bending or folding of the entire material.

The lab discovered that the layers would react to heat in a predictable and repeatable way, allowing for configurations to be designed into the material depending on a number of parameters: the shape and aspect ratio of the LCE, the thickness and patterning of the polystyrene and even the temperature at which the polystyrene was applied.

The lab made spiraling, curling and X-shaped materials that alternately closed in or stood up on four legs. Placing polystyrene on top of one half of a strip of LCE and on the bottom of the other half produced an “S” shape. Verduzco suggested there’s no limit to the complexity of the shapes that could be teased from the material with proper patterning.

The primary direction of folding or wrinkling of the material was set by the temperature at which the polystyrene layer was deposited. In experiments, the researchers found that when the polystyrene layer was applied at 5-6 degrees Celsius (about 42 degrees Fahrenheit), the material would wrinkle perpendicular to the LCE’s nematic director. At 50 C (122 degrees F), the polystyrene wrinkled parallel to the director. The micrometer-scale wrinkles seemed smooth to the naked eye.

As expected, however, if the polystyrene layer was too thick, it would not allow the composite material to bend. And if the temperature got too hot, the polystyrene would pass its glass transition temperature and allow the composite to relax back into its flat shape. When the material cooled to room temperature and the polystyrene became glassy again, it would deform in the opposite direction, but it could return to its initial flat-at-room-temperature state if annealed with a solvent, dicloromethane, that relaxed the layers once more.

“For any application, you would want to be able to change shape and then go back,” Verduzco said. “LCEs are reversible, unlike shape-memory polymers that change shape only once and cannot go back to their initial shape.

“This is important for biomedical applications, such as dynamic substrates for cell cultures or implantable materials that contract and expand in response to stimulus. This is what we are targeting with these applications.”

Lead author Aditya Agrawal and co-author Stacy Pesek are graduate students and Tae Hyun Yun is an undergraduate at Rice. Co-author Walter Chapman is the William W. Akers Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Rice. Verduzco is an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.

The John S. Dunn Foundation Collaborative Research Award Program administered by the Gulf Coast Consortia and the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund supported the research.

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Watch a video of Rice’s morphing material at http://youtu.be/ygcsNTFdH20

Read the abstract at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2014/sm/c3sm51654g#!divAbstract

Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews

Related Materials:

Verduzco Laboratory: http://verduzcolab.blogs.rice.edu

Walter Chapman’s Research Group: http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~saft/chapman.htm

Rice Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering: http://msne.rice.edu

Images for download:

 

 

 

 

http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/1209_POLYMER-1-web.jpg

A composite material created by scientists at Rice University changes shape in a predetermined pattern when heated and changes back when cooled. The morphing material may be useful for bioengineering, optical, pharmaceutical and other applications. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)

 

 

 

 

http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/1209_POLYMER-2-web.jpg

The four-armed morphing material created at Rice University is an example of how such compounds can be programmed to change shape when heated or cooled. Arms of the small sample repeatedly curl when heated and flatten out when cooled. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)

 

 

 

 

http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/1209_POLYMER-3-web.jpg

Rice University polymer scientist Rafael Verduzco, left, and graduate student Aditya Agrawal show a sample of their morphing material, which changes shape in a predetermined pattern when heated. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)

 

 

 

 

http://news.rice.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/1209_POLYMER-4-web.jpg

Rice University graduate student Aditya Agrawal displays a sample of a morphing compound that changes shape in a predetermined pattern when heated. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)

Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/AboutRiceU.

 

 

About Mike Williams

Mike Williams is a senior media relations specialist in Rice University's Office of Public Affairs.